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Skip Navigation LinksDepartment of Housing and Public Works > Construction > Building and plumbing > Pool safety > Pool safety laws > Pool safety certificates

 Pool safety certificates

If you are selling or leasing a property with a pool or spa, you must get a pool safety certificate from a licensed pool safety inspector.

Costs vary, so you may wish to shop around.

Some inspectors can also carry out minor repairs, such as adjusting or replacing a latch and removing climbable objects.

Selling and buying

If you are selling a property with a pool, you must give the buyer:

  • a swimming pool safety certificate before settlement

or

If you are buying a property with a pool, and accept a Notice of No Pool Safety Certificate, you:

  • have 90 days from settlement to get a pool safety certificate
  • are liable for any compliance costs to get your pool certified (unless otherwise negotiated as part of the contract).

Recently built pools

For pools built within the last 2 years, a final inspection certificate or certificate of classification issued by the building certifier can be used as a pool safety certificate for:

  • 1 year for shared pools
  • 2 years for non-shared pools.

Otherwise, a separate pool safety certificate is required if you are selling or leasing a property with a pool.

Leases, hotel stays and other accommodation agreements 

If you are going to rent—or enter into another type of accommodation agreement for—your property, you must get a swimming pool safety certificate. However, this is only needed if a current pool safety certificate does not already exist.

For non-shared pools, such for houses, townhouses or units with their own pool or spa, you must get a pool safety certificate before entering into an accommodation agreement.

For shared pools associated with long-term accommodation, such as a pool in a unit complex, you must get a pool safety certificate within 90 days of entering into the accommodation agreement.



Last updated 15 June 2016    

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Pool safety licensing, compliance and disciplinary functions are managed by the Queensland Building and Construction Commission (QBCC)



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